Washington state braces for a huge landslide: Seventy residents from a farming town are evacuated amid fears a cracked ridge could spill four million cubic yards of rock by March

Washington state braces for a huge landslide: Seventy residents from a farming town are evacuated amid fears a cracked ridge could spill four million cubic yards of rock by March

  • A slow-moving landslide has officials on high alert in Union Gap, Washington 
  • A fracture in Rattlesnake Ridge was first noticed in October and is now moving at about 2.5 inches a day
  • Experts say the landslide will happen sometime between the end of January and early March 
  • Geologists say the landslide will likely fizzle out in a nearby quarry, but there’s a chance it could wipe out some mobile homes and spill over I-82 to dam a river
  • Officials have decided to keep I-82 open, and have set up shipping containers filled with concrete barriers to protect drivers from falling rock

A slow-moving landslide in a fertile farming region in Washington state has forced evacuations as officials prepare for what they say is inevitable — the collapse of a ridge that sits above a few dozen homes and a key highway.

People in Washington are especially wary of landslides following one in 2014 north of Seattle that swept through a tiny community and across a state road, killing dozens.

Experts say the slide could happen as soon as late January or early February above Union Gap, a small agricultural town in the rolling brown foothills of the Cascade Range.

A chunk of one ridge about the size of 24 football fields is expected to break off, spilling an estimated four million cubic yards of rocks and dirt – enough to fill more than 1,200 Olympic swimming pools.

Opinions on the impact vary widely, ranging from little damage to widespread flooding, especially in Union Gap. Some worry floodwaters will stretch into Yakima, which has 94,000 residents and sits just a few miles away.

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About 70 people have been evacuated due to a slow-moving landslide in Washington state. Pictured above is the crack in Rattlesnake Ridge  on January 3

About 70 people have been evacuated due to a slow-moving landslide in Washington state. Pictured above is the crack in Rattlesnake Ridge  on January 3

Experts say the landslide will happen sometime in late January to early March. Above, drove footage from the landslide this weekend

Experts say the landslide will happen sometime in late January to early March. Above, drove footage from the landslide this weekend

Above, another view from drone footage of the landslide this weekend 

Above, another view from drone footage of the landslide this weekend

Experts say the landslide will most likely fizzle out in a nearby quarry. But there's a small chance it could spill over I-82 and dam the Yakima River

Experts say the landslide will most likely fizzle out in a nearby quarry. But there’s a small chance it could spill over I-82 and dam the Yakima River

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Also nearby are the Yakima River and Interstate 82, which connects Oregon to busy Interstate 90.

I82 is the main route through central Washington’s Yakima Valley, which produces many of America’s hops, cherries, apples and mint. The state has deemed it safe to remain open but has placed 44 shipping containers — filled with concrete barriers and weighing 9 to 14 tons each — at the bottom of the ridge to keep random rocks from tumbling into traffic.

The hillside has been sliding since at least October, when authorities began monitoring huge cracks in Rattlesnake Ridge’s western slope. At that time, the landslide was moving at less than an inch (25 millimeters) per day. More recently, it has been measured sliding at 2.5 inches (64 millimeters) per day.

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