BLACK PRESIDENT BUT NO DISASTER RELIEF FOR BLACK TOWN HIT BY TORNADO

GREETINGS,

  “This beast keeps our people in sorrow and unhappiness by depriving them of equal opportunities. The Black man’s wages are calculated by white wicked accountants, preventing the so-called Negro from saving by skyrocketing (in the view of the poor) the prices of the necessities of life. This white beast prosecutes, imprisons and kills those who preach freedom and justice for the poor so-called Negroes. The white man does not want the so-called Negroes to leave America; but she will not divide the spoils of America (the country which she has taken by the force of arms and killing its aboriginal owners, the Indians) with them.”——pg.152,(THE FALL OF AMERICA)    
 
 
     

 PEMBROKE TOWNSHIP: MIRED IN POVERTY , NOW DEVASTATED BY TORNADOES, WITH NO HELP IN SIGHT

The unfathomable depth of the poverty in Pembroke Township, Illinois has been the subject of ten years of sporadic national media attention. Those years have brought flashy press conferences, failed government initiatives and little change.

Now, it seems the township will be passed over once again: after a devastating tornado ripped through the area last Saturday, Pembroke was not declared a “state disaster area” like so many other towns in central Illinois.

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn told The Daily Journal that Kankakee County hadn’t made a request on Pembroke’s behalf. And County Board Chairman Mike Bossert said that the damage “might not rise to the level required to make that designation.”

This kind of buck-passing and speculative half-commitment from the government is nothing new for Pembroke Township.

An hour’s drive south of Chicago, the mostly-black village officially has around 3,000 residents, though the town’s preacher and doctor speculate that another 2,000 people live in the nearby woods, where census takers never go.

The Chicago Tribune reports that in the area, the average household income is around $14,000, compared with over $50,000 nationwide. In Pembroke, 98 percent of school children qualify for free lunches. Few have running water. Car tires are placed on top of roofs to keep them from blowing away in the wind. Residents burn old car batteries for warmth in the winter.

There is no bank, supermarket, police force, pharmacy, barber shop or gas station in Pembroke, or neighboring Hopkins Park, or nearby St. Anne; for these things, those residents that can afford it take the 20-mile bus trip to Kankakee, going over unsteady gravel and dirt roads…….. HERE IS MORE

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