AMERICA NOW RECOGNIZES THAT "IT'S THE ASIATIC NATION WHO WILL TAKE HER"

—FROM “THE THEOLOGY OF TIME”—pg.273..”YOU NOTICE THAT THE NATIONS ARE CONTINUING TO UNITE ON THE OUTSIDE OF AMERICA.IN A BOOK THERE IN THE BIBLE,IT SAYS THAT THEY SAID,COME LET US GO UP AGAINST HER,NOON DAY,LET US GO AND TAKER HER WHILE SHE’S ASLEEP.THIS IS REFERRING TO AMERICA. IT’S THE ASIATIC NATION WHO ARE THE ONES TAKING HER. THEY ARE ABOUT READY TO STRIKE AND THE COUNTRY(AMERICA) KNOWS THIS TO BE TRUE.”—HE(THE MOST HONORABLE ELIJAH MUHAMMAD SPECIFICALLY ABOUT 2 ASIAN NATIONS WHO WERE LEADING THE CHARGE.LET US SEE WHO THESE TWO ARE.ON PAGE 233 OF “THE THEOLOGY OF TIME” MESSENGER MUHAMMAD WRITES…:”HE WAS YELLING OVER THERE BEFORE THE LAST WAR,ASIA FOR ASIATIC.ASIATIC IS FOR ASIA,UNTIL THEY GIVE THEM A DEAF EAR;THEN,THE ENEMY ALL BUT RAN THEM OUT OF ASIA. NOW HE SINGS THAT SONG AND HE GOT PLENTY WHO ARE READY NOW TO UNITE WITH HIM AND SAY ASIA IS FOR ASIANS. HE LAID HOLD TO HIS BIG BROTHER THE OTHER DAY, CHINA. CHINA LAID HOLD TO HIS LITTLE BROTHER JAPAN. ”
NOW LOOK AT THIS;” Obama confronts an Asia reshaped by China’s rise

Residents raise slogans during a rally, protesting against relocating Futenama Marine airfield on the southern island of Okinawa, in Ginowan, Japan, Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. Japanese Foreign Minister Katsuya Okada said Sunday that no deal on relocating U.S. troops on the Japanese island can be expected during President Barack Obama’s visit this week, saying the issue needs more time to resolve. The banner reads: “Oppose relocation within the prefecture (state).” (AP Photo/Kyodo News) (AP)

People are seen at the venue of the APEC summit, Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009 in Singapore. President Barack Obama and other Asia-Pacific leaders, meeting at a summit this week, will push for a new global strategy to reduce the crippling imbalances in the world economy blamed for the severe financial crisis.(AP Photo/Wong Maye-E) (Wong Maye-e – AP)

President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks about health care reform in the Rose Garden of the White House on Saturday, Nov. 7, 2009, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) (Evan Vucci – AP)

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao looks on at the opening of the 4th Ministerial Conference of the Sino-African Forum in Egypt’s Sharm el Sheik resort Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil) (Amr Nabil – AP)

In this undated photo released by Korean Central News Agency via Korea News Service in Tokyo Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009, North Korean leader Kim Jong Il checks corn during a visit to a cooperative farm in North Korea’s South Hamgyeong Province. (AP Photo/Korean Central News Agency Via Korea News Service) (AP)

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By CHARLES HUTZLER
The Associated Press
Monday, November 9, 2009; 8:46 AM

BEIJING — Days after coming to power in September, Japan’s new prime minister broached forming a new East Asian trading bloc with rival China – one that would exclude the United States.

Some in Washington took it as a snub from the nation that has been America’s rock in Asia for decades. Even more, Tokyo’s new rhetoric underscored how China’s rapid rise to power is challenging Washington’s once-dominant sway in the region.

This is the reality President Barack Obama confronts as he departs Thursday for his first Asia trip, perhaps his most challenging overseas journey yet. He’ll find a region outgrowing a half-century of U.S. supremacy and questioning America’s relevance to its future. More so than Obama’s previous foreign trips, this nine-day, four-country tour has the president on something like a salvage mission.

The trip also comes at a delicate time for Obama at home.

He is wrestling with one of the toughest decisions of his 10-month presidency, a war strategy for Afghanistan, and is urging Congress to approve his biggest domestic priority, health care.

Those pressing concerns make it notable that he is spending so much time away – a sign of Asia’s importance to the U.S. and the need to tend to relationships there without delay – though he put off his original departure by a day over the weekend because of Thursday’s deadly shooting spree at the Fort Hood military base in Texas. Obama will speak to U.S. troops in Alaska and South Korea, with his much-awaited decision on more troops for the Afghanistan war probably still pending.

Obama stops first in Japan, a traditional U.S. stalwart now looking toward closer engagement with China and the rest of Asia. He makes a two-city stop in China, where leaders proud of their country’s one-generation leap to prosperity seek a bigger say in shaping the region’s affairs.

The president also visits Singapore for a summit of Asia-Pacific leaders, where his participation is being cut by a day, and wraps up his trip in South Korea. Those countries are having to accommodate a more muscular China while wondering whether a U.S. weakened by financial crisis is in decline.

“Asia is changing very fast. It’s undergoing a fundamental transition,” said Huang Jing, a Chinese politics expert at the National University of Singapore. “This is not the kind of Asia or Asia-Pacific of America’s traditional understanding. That old understanding is that America is dominant but friendly to the developing nations and Japan, America’s perpetual ally, is No. 1. Asia is now totally different and China is the No. 1, not Japan.”

Throughout his travels, starting with a scene-setting speech in Japan, Obama is expected to deliver a message of staunch U.S. commitment to old friends and newer partners alike, promising to help keep what for decades has been one of the fastest growing regions of the world secure and thriving, according to U.S. officials.

In Tokyo, he’s likely to call for a reinvigorated alliance with Japan while insisting that new Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama live up to a pending agreement on reconfiguring U.S. military bases. He’s scheduled to take part in Beijing in the kind of pomp that Chinese leaders crave as a sign of respect, but also plans an event with Chinese university students aimed at telegraphing U.S. values to a broader Chinese audience.

On the sidelines of the gathering of Asia-Pacific leaders, he’ll hold a first-ever summit with Southeast Asia’s 10-nation alliance, a grouping whose economies are increasingly tied to a growing China but still are anxious about Chinese power. Included in that meeting will be Myanmar’s leader – the first such meeting between a U.S. president and the head of a repressive government formerly shunned by Washington, though now part of a new outreach by the Obama administration.

CONTINUED ;Throughout, issues like North Korea’s and Iran’s nuclear programs are likely to be raised repeatedly, though little concrete progress is expected.

While popular in some parts of the region, Obama does not have the rock-star appeal in Asia that he has in Europe and elsewhere. He will have to overcome strong suspicions among Asian leaders that he is more concerned about domestic battles over health care and the economy than about matters like freer trade that are so crucial to Asian nations and U.S. businesses.

Obama comes to Asia “bringing absolutely nothing to the table” on trade, said Michael Green, a White House Asia adviser during the Bush administration and now an analyst at the Washington-based Center for Strategic and International Studies. Without American leadership on trade, the fear is that the U.S. will be left behind while other nations roar ahead with their own agreements, Green said.

“There is a risk that he will come to Asia for just a star turn and photo opportunities while reserving his strength for other battles. But more is needed and should be expected of him,” Simon Tay of the Singapore Institute for International Affairs said.

After the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the Bush administration gained a reputation in Asia for distraction and an overemphasis on security. Meanwhile, China has supplanted the U.S. as the top or leading trading partner of Japan, South Korea and the ASEAN nations. The Chinese economy, a decade ago only slightly larger than Italy’s, is on track to next year surpass Japan’s, the world’s No. 2.

Chief among Obama’s goals on the trip will be to make “vividly clear to the peoples of Asia that the U.S. is here to stay in Asia,” Jeffrey Bader, Obama’s top Asia adviser, said at a public event in Washington on Friday. “As Asia continues to grow and as new groupings and structures take shape, the U.S. will be a player and participant on the ground floor, not a distant spectator.”

In Japan, where Obama and his election inspired the public, it looks like the president will have his most difficult stop.

Prime Minister Hatoyama won election on an Obama-like message of change. But he’s begun rethinking the U.S.-Japan alliance in which Tokyo has often felt itself the junior partner. He proposed the East Asian community that initially excluded the U.S., though he has since sidestepped the issue.

His government plans to end Japan’s Indian Ocean refueling mission that supports U.S.-led forces in Afghanistan. His review of the agreement on basing 47,000 U.S. troops in Japan has caused particular tension, chiefly over relocating Futenma Marine air field on Okinawa. The U.S. has agreed to a more remote location on the island while Hatoyama has suggested moving the forces off the island. U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates last month demanded Tokyo not put off resolving the issue until next year as Hatoyama has hinted.

In China, sizable distrust over trade tensions, Tibet and other human rights issues and Beijing’s robust military buildup are likely to be papered over.

The Obama administration has tried to set a more constructive, cooperative tone for relations, calling Beijing a needed partner in tackling global issues like the economic downturn and climate change. The governments have identified clean energy as ripe for cooperation.

Chief among Obama’s tasks in Beijing will be to establish the kind of trust that President Hu Jintao had with George W. Bush, according to Chinese scholars. China reacted angrily to recent U.S. moves to impose punitive tariffs to stem surging imports of low-cost Chinese-made tires, seeing it as reneging on Obama’s promise earlier this year not to resort to protectionism during the economic crisis.

Associated Press reporters Jennifer Loven in Washington, Malcolm Foster in Tokyo, Jae-Soon Chang in Seoul and Eileen Ng in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, contributed to this report. “————–

HERE IS A QUOTE FROM “THE FALL OF AMERICA”; ” America is careful not to give any help to her Black once-slave for four hundred years to do something for themselves. America wants to keep her Black slave tied while she watches their movements.

10 If we go to her asking America for a territory so that we can live to ourselves, she turns a deaf ear to us. We helped America for four hundred years, in every respect as though we were one-half owners of the country. We have gotten nothing in return but beatings, cheatings and shootings down on the highway.

11 If we think that there is a God of Mercy (and there is One)…should we not think that He will sympathize with the poor Black slave to receive justice from his master?

12 The Black slave helped to make America rich. Would Allah, (God) be silent forever? Being the God of Righteousness and Justice, would He not take to Himself the work of aiding the poor Black people against their evil oppressors?

13 America wants everyone to help her bemoan all of her set-backs but when she causes others to fall…breaks up the countries of other peoples and destroys their independence and freedom, she laughs and prides herself as doing a great thing. She puts her feet upon their economic neck and destroys their independence as a nation.

14 All this now returns to America. The little nations are now awake. They had looked for true friendship from America but instead America deceived them.

15 Again, I repeat, the Bible prophecy…”As thou has done, it shall be done unto thee.” There is no friend for America. Also it is written in the Bible, “In the day of thy fall, none shall help thee….”

16 Why? Because you, America, have been and are an aide of the destruction and fall of other peoples. So who should help you in the day of your fall? This is what Allah (God) wants to bring home to America through His prophets.

17 The Holy Qur’an refers to America in this kind of prophecy: “When her doom comes there will come one calamity after another.” As soon as she thinks she is getting over the sore made by a previous calamity, another will attack her.

18 America is undergoing all that is prophesied against her. It is nothing new. It is well-known.

19 We have been eating the bread of affliction and suffering the poisonous bites of our white slave master. It has caused actual death of our proper mental way of thinking. The natural brain of the Black slave is poisoned and cannot think for itself.

20 So Allah (God) is asking us to separate from white America. But the mentally dead do not want to go from her for they have not yet gotten the knowledge of truth of our God, Allah and His Mercy for them.

21 The Black – slave – children are victimized by the white slavemaster, because of the condition the white – slave – master brought our Black slave-fathers up in. They do not readily hear the right answer to the problem. Regardless, to how I cry in their midst, they are poisoned and mentally dead.”–pg.110-111(THE FALL OF AMERICA)

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